72 Results

News

In a case involving the use of summary judgment motions (Hryniak v. Mauldin, 2014 SCC 7) , the Supreme Court of Canada discussed access to justice issues in providing courts with guidance on the test for such motions. It held that summary judgment rules must be “interpreted broadly, favouring proportionality and fair access to the…

News

Canadian human rights tribunals have, of late, been rendering decisions which examine the reach of “family status” as a prohibited ground of discrimination. Recently, the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal (the “Tribunal”) examined a case that involved eldercare responsibilities the applicant had for his mother-in-law. It found that the eligibility rules of the employer’s Relocation Directive…

News

In the last several years, there have been some significant punitive damages awards in employment cases, where the court found that an employer acted in a “callous” or “hardball” manner upon termination. This recently happened in Pate Estate v. Galway-Cavendish and Harvey (Township). A trial judge had awarded $550,000 against a Township which had acted…

News

A recent decision of the British Columbia Court of Appeal, Lacey v. Weyerhaeuser, considered an employer’s right to unilaterally change post-retirement benefits. Although the retiree benefits at issue in this case had been voluntarily instituted, it was found that the employer had represented that the retiree benefits would be maintained on and after retirement, and…

News

The Supreme Court of Canada recently heard an appeal that involves the intersection of privacy rights with a union’s duty of representation to its membership. At issue was the request of the appellant that her employer not disclose her personal information to her union, to which she was obligated to pay dues but declined to…

News

The Court of Appeal for Ontario has affirmed that if restrictive covenants are to be enforceable, they must be properly drafted. In Eagle Professional Resources Inc. v. MacMullin, the Court upheld the finding of a motion judge that “non-competition” clauses in the employment contracts of employees who left the plaintiff’s employ and joined a competitor…

News

In a case that will be eagerly anticipated by the labour relations community, the Supreme Court of Canada has granted leave to appeal from a decision of the Saskatchewan Court of Appeal which found that the “right to strike” is not constitutionally protected. Courts have been grappling with the extent of the constitutional protection for…

News

In Dziecielski v. Lighting Dimensions, the Court of Appeal for Ontario recently upheld an employer’s decision to terminate a long-service employee with an otherwise clean disciplinary record for driving a company vehicle while intoxicated. While driving, the employee had been involved in a car accident and was criminally charged. The lower court had examined the…