Hicks Morley Information and Privacy Post – 2013

Dear Friends: It’s early October 2013, and here’s what’s on our minds. With great pleasure, we’ve released this year’s Information and Privacy Post – a review of 60 information management and privacy cases that caught our attention in the last year. We like the exercise of producing the Post because pulling together and organizing recent…

Check your email recipient list before you press “send”

Employers must take care not to press the “send” button too soon as inadvertently copying an incorrect person on an email communication can have unintended results. In Fernandes v. Marketforce Communications, an employer emailed information to its lawyer setting out concerns regarding the continued employment of an employee. By mistake, that employee was copied on…

Misuse of Confidential Information – Are You Prepared?

An employee’s misuse of confidential information housed on computers or electronically can expose an employer’s business to serious risk of harm and potential liability. Improperly managed, these situations can create a crisis: witness Bank of America and the WikiLeaks threat. Hicks Morley has been successful in assisting clients who have had their confidential information misused…

Ten Questions and Answers about Computer Use Policies

It’s January 2012. Last year the Court of Appeal for Ontario recognized that an employee had a reasonable expectation of privacy that arose out of his personal use of a work computer. As discussed in a companion FTR Now called How the New Privacy Tort Will Affect Employers, this month the Court of Appeal recognized…

How the New Privacy Tort Will Affect Employers

On January 18th, 2012, the Court of Appeal for Ontario recognized a new “intrusion upon seclusion” civil cause of action. In this FTR Now, we describe the new cause of action (or “tort”) and identify its significance to employers. THE INTRUSION UPON SECLUSION TORT Under Ontario law it is now clear that individuals can sue…

School Board Update – Court of Appeal Recognizes Employee Privacy Rights in Work Computer Subject to Employer Policy and Procedure

One week ago, the Ontario Court of Appeal issued a judgement that is very significant for its consideration of an employee’s expectation of privacy in personal information stored on a work computer. In R. v. Cole, the Court recognized an expectation of privacy in the specific circumstances of the case, but also demonstrated a willingness…

Cloud Computing, Second Life and the University

This short university sector bulletin raises an important policy issue about setting rules that govern the choice faculty and staff have in using the internet to perform their jobs. We would like to raise and invite a policy discussion on the legal issues raised by “cloud computing” and the increasing business use of consumer-marketed internet…