Human Resources Legislative Update

Federal Government Launches Consultations to Improve the Collective Bargaining Process

Human Resources Legislative Update

Federal Government Launches Consultations to Improve the Collective Bargaining Process

Date: October 20, 2022

On October 19, 2022, the federal government announced that it is seeking public feedback regarding its plan to improve the collective bargaining process.

The government states that the consultation was launched in response to its commitment to introduce legislation by the end of 2023 to prohibit the use of replacement workers during a strike or lockout. To that end, the government is seeking feedback regarding the use of replacement workers in federally-regulated workplaces.

The government is also seeking feedback on improving the maintenance of activities process. In particular, the consultation will focus on the process for deciding whether certain activities need to be maintained during a strike or lockout. The government states that it is not looking to expand the types of services that need to be maintained during a strike or lockout.

As a part of the consultation, the government is looking for input on various items, including:

  • first-hand experiences with replacement workers and the maintenance of activities process,
  • potential impacts of the changes on stakeholders and their operations,
  • suggestions for change, and
  • key policy-design questions.

Those interested in providing their input are asked to email their feedback, but must do so by December 16, 2022. The government states that it will also invite selected stakeholders to participate in virtual roundtable meetings.

The feedback will be used to inform the development of legislation in 2023.


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