The July 24, 2018 issue of Labour Notes® newsletter features an article authored by Hicks Morley lawyer Ryan Plener. In the article “Appeal Court Rules on Termination Clauses and Proper ‘Failsafe’ Language,” Ryan discusses how a recent decision by the Ontario Court of Appeal, where it reversed the lower court decision, could serve as an example to clarify the different interpretations of the employment contract provisions which limit entitlements upon termination.

Canadian Lawyer Magazine quoted Hicks Morley’s Julia Nanos in a July 3, 2018 article titled “Retailers squeezed by new rules.” The article discusses how some of the new laws implemented in Ontario, such as calculations for holiday pay and equal pay for equal work are affecting restaurants and retailers.

Hicks Morley’s Jessica Toldo authored an article in Employment and Labour Law Reporter titled “Pay Equity Compliance: An Update From The Supreme Court of Canada.” The article discusses two decisions by The Supreme Court of Canada pertaining to Quebec’s Pay Equity Act (Act) that serve as a reminder to all employers of the importance of complying with their governing pay equity legislation….

Hicks Morley is pleased to announce that a new associate has joined the firm. Working out of our Toronto office, Nisha Dhanoa practises litigation, advising both private and public sector businesses on a wide variety of issues, including wrongful competition, shareholder disputes, executive compensation and contracts as well as employee terminations.

The Summer 2018 issue of OMHRA’s ECHO newsletter features two articles authored by Hicks Morley lawyers Anna Karimian and Jessica Toldo. In the article “Landmark Decision Finds Fippa’s Delay / Block of Public Access to Adjudicative Records of Administrative Tribunals Unconstitiutional,” Anna and Jessica discuss the Toronto Star v AG Ontario case where a landmark decision prompted by the Toronto Star, the Superior Court…

Hicks Morley’s Thomas Agnew authored an article in Benefits Canada titled “Court Confirms Employer’s Right to Change Job Conditions.” In a recent decision, the Ontario Superior Court of Justice found that an employer didn’t constructively dismiss a long-service employee when it provided the individual with 18 months of working notice prior to asking her to enter into a new employment contract that included changes to vacation pay and a signing bonus…