Case In Point

Arbitrator Upholds Mandatory Vaccination Policy

· 4 min read

On November 9, 2021, Arbitrator Von Veh upheld the mandatory vaccination policy (Policy) implemented by a security company, finding the company acted reasonably in implementing the Policy and that it did not breach the collective agreement. The award provides some helpful guidance for employers that have implemented similar policies.  In United Food And Commercial Workers…

Case In Point

In Rahman v Cannon Design Architecture Inc., a recent decision of the Ontario Superior Court of Justice, the Court distinguished the Ontario Court of Appeal’s landmark decision in Waksdale v Swegon North America, finding that on the facts of the case a provision which denied entitlements upon termination for just cause did not amount to…

Human Resources Legislative Update

On March 18, 2021, the federal government announced that it has launched a consultation for Canadians to share their views on the following issues in federally regulated workplaces: “gig work” (a.k.a work “where workers enter into short-term contracts to complete specific and often one-off tasks, generally through digital platforms”) a “right to disconnect,” for example,…

Case In Point

In Mikelsteins v. Morrison Hershfield Limited, the Ontario Court of Appeal confirmed its earlier finding that an employee’s common law entitlements upon termination of employment are distinct from any rights the employee may have under a shareholder agreement where they have purchased the shares separate and apart from their compensation structure.      Background In June…

Case In Point

In one of its final decisions of 2020, C.M. Callow Inc. v. Zollinger, the Supreme Court of Canada held that parties to any and all contracts (which would include employment contracts) cannot lie or otherwise knowingly deceive each other about matters directly linked to the performance of the contract. This type of deceptive conduct is…

FTR Now

Employers and human resource professionals will undoubtedly remember 2020 as the “year of the pandemic.” But … there were also legal developments in 2020 that were not related to COVID-19. In this FTR Now, we look at some of the year’s notable “non-pandemic” cases and legislative developments of interest. We also identify some decisions and…

FTR Now

On October 16, 2020, the Supreme Court of Canada released its decision in Fraser v. Canada (Attorney General). Justice Abella, writing for the majority, held that the inability of members who participated in a job-sharing program to “buy back” pension credits under the employer’s pension plan amounted to discrimination on the basis of sex, contrary to s. 15(1) of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. In separate dissenting reasons, Justices Brown and Rowe on the one hand and Justice Côté on the other held that the appeal ought to have been dismissed, although for different reasons.

FTR Now

On October 9, 2020, the Supreme Court of Canada released its decision in Matthews v. Ocean Nutrition Canada Ltd. It confirmed that where terminated employees would be entitled to a bonus or other incentive payments during the reasonable notice period, employers must use clear and unambiguous language to remove or limit their common law rights. The Supreme Court also distinguished between the obligation to provide reasonable notice of termination and a breach of the duty to exercise good faith in the manner of dismissal.

Case In Point

In its recent decision Ontario v Association of Ontario Midwives, the Ontario Divisional Court upheld two decisions of the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario pertaining to sex discrimination and pay equity, reaffirming that employers have an obligation to take proactive steps to ensure that sex-segregated workers are compensated free from sex discrimination and that a…

Case In Point

In Waksdale v Swegon North America, the Ontario Court of Appeal ruled that the “without cause” and “with cause” termination clauses in an employment contract must be read together: if one is not compliant with the Employment Standards Act, 2000 (ESA), both are unenforceable. The plaintiff employee sued the defendant employer for damages for wrongful…

FTR Now

On May 14, 2020, the Ontario government announced that certain workplaces will be able to resume operations beginning May 19, 2020, signalling the start of Stage 1 of the second phase of the province’s reopening strategy, “A Framework for Reopening our Province” (Stage 1). The government also announced additional seasonal services and activities that may open May 16, 2020.