Appellate Court Overturns Summary Judgment Decision that Former Employee Owed $20m in Damages to Employer; Matter Remitted for Trial

The decision of a summary judgment motion judge who ordered a former employee to pay his former employer $20 million in damages has been overturned by the Court of Appeal. In Plate v. Atlas Copco Canada Inc., the Court held that the motion judge erred when he found a trial was not necessary and proceeded…

A Cautionary Tale: Appellate Court Upholds Judgment Against Employer for Punitive Damages, Aggravated Damages and “Unusually High” Costs

In Ruston v. Keddco MFG. (2011) Ltd., 2019 ONCA 125 (CanLII)(Keddco), a unanimous Court of Appeal for Ontario upheld a substantial damages and costs award against an employer that breached its “duty of good faith and fair dealing in the manner of dismissal.” The Keddco decision serves as an important reminder for employers across Canada…

Appellate Court Considers Employment Issues Arising out of a Termination Post-Sale of Business

In Kerzner v American Iron and Metal Company Inc., the Ontario Court of Appeal considered a number of complex issues arising out of a sale of business and successive employment contracts entered into after that sale. The Court provided guidance on what can and cannot be agreed to during those transitions and how releases should…

OLRB Finds Global Payroll not to be Considered in Calculation of ESA Severance Pay

In Doug Hawkes v. Max Aicher (North America) Limited, the Ontario Labour Relations Board (OLRB) addressed the issue of whether an employer’s global payroll should be considered in determining an employee’s entitlement to severance pay under the Employment Standards Act, 2000 (ESA). The OLRB determined that global payroll should not be included for the purposes…

Employment and Labour Law Reporter Publishes an Article by Will McLennan on ESA-Only Termination Clause and Common Law Notice

Hicks Morley’s Will McLennan authored an article in Employment and Labour Law Reporter titled “”ESA-Only” Termination Clause Complied with ESA but Failed to Rebut Presumption of Common Law Notice.” The article argues how the Divisional Court recently upheld a decision of the Superior Court of Justice which held that a termination clause in an employment contract which complied with the Employment Standards Act, 2000 (ESA) failed to clearly rebut the presumption of entitlement to common law notice.

Cause Termination Upheld Where Employee Found to Have Installed Spyware on Employer’s Computer

The Ontario Superior Court of Justice recently upheld a cause termination where an employee was found to have installed spyware onto his employer’s computer. The Court also considered the availability of the “after-acquired cause” defence In Sankreacha v. Cameron J. and Beach Sales Ltd., the plaintiff’s employment as a service advisor in the automotive department…

“ESA-Only” Termination Clause Complied with ESA but Failed to Rebut Presumption of Common Law Notice

The Divisional Court recently upheld a decision of the Superior Court of Justice which held that a termination clause in an employment contract which complied with the Employment Standards Act, 2000 (ESA) failed to clearly rebut the presumption of entitlement to common law notice. The plaintiff was therefore owed reasonable notice. In Movati Athletic (Group)…

OMHRA Fall ECHO Newsletter Features Two Articles by Jessica Toldo

The Fall 2018 issue of OMHRA’s ECHO newsletter features two articles co-authored by Hicks Morley lawyer Jessica Toldo.

In the article “Considerations for Municipal Employers When Drafting Termination Clauses in Employment Contracts,” Jessica discusses the importance of municipal employers having a clear and well-crafted termination provision to minimize the risk that a reviewing court will find the clause to be unenforceable, should litigation arise and highlight five key considerations when drafting termination clauses in light of some important developments in the case law.

The second article authored by Jessica, “HRTO Determines Requiring Proof of Eligibility to Work in Canada on a Permanent Basis is Discriminatory,” reviews a recent case where the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario found that a pre-employment ‘permanence requirement’ was discriminatory on the basis of the applicant’s citizenship.