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FTR Now

In a decision dated April 17, 2018, the Divisional Court has invited arbitrators to reject the so-called “void ab initio” doctrine that in the past has often resulted in discipline imposed by management being rendered null and void due to the breach of a sunset clause or other similar provisions. Learn more in this FTR Now.

FTR Now

Pension plans that meet the definition of specified Ontario multi-employer pension plans (SOMEPPs) are one step closer to having the option to convert accrued defined benefits (DB) to target benefits (TB) – and one step closer to a permanent exemption from solvency funding. If your organization participates in a SOMEPP, find out what this could mean for your organization in this FTR Now.

FTR Now

Many Social Services agencies across Ontario are currently in collective bargaining, or will be shortly. With key Bill 148 amendments to the Employment Standards Act, 2000 (ESA), the Labour Relations Act, 1995 (LRA) and the Occupational Health and Safety Act now in force, planning your strategic approach is essential to achieving outcomes that will work for your organization, and support your mandate. Learn how you can prepare for the bargaining table in this FTR Now..

FTR Now

Ontario Budget 2018

On March 28, 2018, the Ontario government tabled its 2018 Budget, A Plan for Care and Opportunity and introduced Bill 31, the Plan for Care and Opportunity Act (Budget Measures), 2018. The Budget outlines key initiatives around retirement security and pension reform, healthcare, education, further initiatives to specifically address gender equality issues, representation of women, and more…

FTR Now

Effective January 1, 2018, the Workplace Safety and Insurance Board (WSIB) will utilize a single indexing factor to calculate the annual adjustment to all indexed benefits and the legislated amounts as a result of recent amendments to the Workplace Safety and Insurance Act, 1997 (WSIA). To support the implementation of these changes, the WSIB has developed a new policy (18-01-14 Annual Indexing) and revised several existing benefit payment policies. Learn more in this FTR Now.

FTR Now

In a recent decision, the Supreme Court of Canada held that workplace discrimination can be perpetrated by someone other than the complainant’s employer or superior. Accordingly, employers should be aware that they may be responsible for discrimination against workers who are not their employees, where a “sufficient nexus” exists between a complainant and a respondent in the employment context. Learn more in this FTR Now.